Odor Removal with Ozone

Every great idea has pros and cons.  Ozone is found in nature, and can be made to work for us if you know what you are doing.  To get the idea, ozone is just another form of oxygen.  Normal, breathable oxygen is O2, and ozone is O3.  It is like enriched oxygen, and one thing […]

Every great idea has pros and cons.  Ozone is found in nature, and can be made to work for us if you know what you are doing.  To get the idea, ozone is just another form of oxygen.  Normal, breathable oxygen is O2, and ozone is O3.  It is like enriched oxygen, and one thing oxygen (or ozone) does is to change things via “Oxidation”.

Oxidation is a chemical-free way to treat environmental threats.  Ozone reverts back to normal oxygen abut 30 minutes after creation because it is unstable.  The unstable nature is that the extra oxygen atom easily falls off to attach to other element.  When this process happens, an oxide is formed.  You see this in nature then iron rusts, copper turns green, or rubber hardens after long periods of exposure.
Well as enriched oxygen, the oxidation process happens more quickly because of that loose oxygen atom.  And, that is about as close to nature as you can get.  Ozone leaves no chemical residue behind, but there is a distinct odor for ozone that is kind of like the chlorine smell in a pool area.  Over-application of ozone may cause the ozone to endure longer than the normal 12-24 of the mild smell of the process.

This brings me to one of the first warnings.  Do not allow any ozone treatment to go more than eight hours.  This is by recommendation of the National Ozone Association.  In fact, the idea is to apply the amount of ozone and time of application commensurate with the actual problem for best results.  NOAI has issued, “The Best Practices for Ozone Remediation” that anyone who offers ozone treatments should read, apply, and support.

Critics of ozone treatments bemoan the concerns for ozone treatments argue that ozone is harmful to people and pets.  But, the first mandate for ozone applicators that the house or building must be vacated (empty) prior to and during the ozone treatment.  Ozone is a known “respiratory irritant”, but no more so than many of the nasty chemicals that are sold in your local store.  Try looking at your bug spray, oven cleaner, or that bottle of bleach.

Ozone will destroy foul odors, kill mold and mildew, effectively sanitize the area, and even neutralizes some pollutants in the home.  Just be sure to do a good job of cleaning before you apply ozone.  Ozone is not a substitute for cleaning, so the right approach is to make an ozone application the final process for best results.

To assure that any ozone application is done right, make sure the service is trained and certified as  a Certified Ozone Technician with NOAI, and they they subscribe to the “Best Practices for Ozone Remediation.



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